#Get2Yes Projects

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A Replacement for the Massey Tunnel

The George Massey Tunnel is a critical component of a transportation network that supports the local, regional and provincial economies, as well as facilitating trade through the Asia-Pacific Gateway. Since the Tunnel opened in 1959, Metro Vancouver’s population and economy have grown significantly. As a result, traffic congestion and safety at the George Massey Tunnel have become major issues, and Delta, Surrey, ICBA and others have worked tirelessly to make it a priority issue for the Provincial government. A new crossing is urgently needed to improve safety, reduce vehicle collisions and improve emergency response times at the existing George Massey...

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Build the Coastal GasLink Pipeline

LNG Canada, the largest private investment in Canadian history, #Got2Yes. But the Coastal GasLink pipeline, which will feed natural gas from northeast B.C. to the LNG Canada plant in Kitimat is under siege by a rogue group of U.S.-funded professional protestors and a handful of Indigenous dissidents.

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Expand Highway 1 from Langley to Chilliwack

The Fraser Valley is booming – and our roads haven’t kept up. Government needs to keep B.C. moving by expanding Highway 1 to six lanes between Langley and Chilliwack – and improving the woefully inadequate and unsafe merge lanes.

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BC Deserves Fair, Open Tendering

Giving the NDP millions of dollars in donations shouldn’t mean a monopoly on taxpayer-funded construction, but the NDP Government has announced sweeping changes to government procurement policy by bringing back restrictive and regressive 1990s-style project labour agreements. This is a radical departure from the fair, open and transparent process that has successfully built our province over much of its history.

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Build the Trans Mountain Oil and Gas pipeline

What happens when even a federal cabinet approval isn’t enough to get a pipeline built? Taxpayers end up purchasing a pipeline that the private sector would have built – except that red tape, professional protestors, U.S.-funded eco-activists and deluded politicians are out to kill this vital pipeline.